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3D printing software tools: OpenSCAD

For many people, there is something of a “honeymoon” period right after they’ve finished building their first 3D printer. You’ve got everything working, your printer is nicely tuned, you’ve gotten calibration shapes to come out jus like you want them. Congratulations! Youmagine and Thingiverse have become your favorite websites, and your’e spending hours just looking . . . → Read More: 3D printing software tools: OpenSCAD

RepRap 101: Activating Marlin's EEPROM functions, and what that does for you.

I’ve been asked about this a few times, and it seemed appropriate to put together a quick post on the topic.

In my humble opinion, one of the most useful features of Marlin is the ability to save a bunch of settings to what is essentially a non-volatile area memory that exists on the . . . → Read More: RepRap 101: Activating Marlin’s EEPROM functions, and what that does for you.

Check out my Facebook Page!

I’ve set up a Facebook page specific to 3D printing. I think this will make it a lot easier to make small updates that don’t seem to warrant a full blog post. Check it out!

Zennmaster’s 3D printing on Facebook

RepRap 101: Calibrating your Extruder, Part 2: Fine-Tuning.

At this point, you have most likely done some basic calibration on your extrusion. If not, please check out part one of this series:

Once you’ve got that done, you’re ready to move to the next step, and dial in that calibration just a little bit more finely.

The method I use is a . . . → Read More: RepRap 101: Calibrating your Extruder, Part 2: Fine-Tuning.

RepRap 101: Calibrating your extruder, part 1: E-steps

So you’ve got your printer built, and you’re ready to start spitting plastic. Maybe you get a few test prints done, which turns out to be just enough to demonstrate that something isn’t quite right. In any case, you’re going to need to make an initial calibration of your extrusion.

This is also something . . . → Read More: RepRap 101: Calibrating your extruder, part 1: E-steps

RepRap 101: Using silicate-based putty to install a thermistor in a hotend.

It may seem obvious; a hotend needs two things to regulate temperature: a heat source to provide the heat, and a temperature sensor to provide feedback as to whether the hotend is too hot, too cool, or in the Goldilocks zone, “Just Right”.

The most commonly used temperature sensor is the thermistor, which is a . . . → Read More: RepRap 101: Using silicate-based putty to install a thermistor in a hotend.